One of the first components to creating your life of Vitality is to define success on your terms (not the terms that everyone else has created for you). This can be tough, because we often have to wade through decades of programming and a lot of other people’s ideas of what success looks like.

When I first started setting goals for myself, a lot of the goals that I had were actually my dad’s goals. I felt like if I was going to start a business (instead of the traditional route of working up the corporate ladder), I was going to have to work a ton and make a bunch of money in order to be considered “successful”. I felt like in order to validate my decision to skip the traditional way of doing things, I had to do things that deep down, I really didn’t care about.

There’s no surprise that working towards these goals eventually made me feel really burnt out and unhappy. What I really wanted was to make a living helping people quickly learn things that took me a really long time to learn. I eventually realized I didn’t need to be making six figures or working 80-100 hours a week in order to consider myself a success. Through my experience, I learned I’d rather work less and steadily build my business.

So what did my definition of success look like? Having a lot of free time, living near the ocean, and supporting myself by helping other people accomplish their goals. By getting honest with myself, I could feel really good about where I was at. By appreciating where you are currently at, you are allowing yourself to reach even greater levels of success. That’s because you aren’t coming from a place of lack, you are coming from a place of gratitude.

Here are some questions to answer that will help you start defining your definition of success: what makes you feel the happiest? When do you feel your best? What would you like your schedule to look like? Where do you want to live? What would you do if you didn’t have to worry about how you’d make money doing it?  

Know that your definition of success will change at different times in your life, especially after major life changes (i.e. getting married, having kids, starting a business, retiring, etc.). You can always come back and redefine your definition of success as it becomes more clear to you. The point is to get clear on it so you can use it to motivate you to create life on your terms–not the terms of those around you. If you need help with this, feel free to book a 1:1 session with me and we’ll create your definition of success together!

Now over to you…Do you struggle with defining your version of success? Is there someone else’s definition of success that you are trying to force upon yourself? What is your definition of success? I’d love to hear from you in the comments below :)

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